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Waverly Student Organizes Special Fundraiser

Waverly Student Organizes Special Fundraiser photo
Waverly Avenue Elementary School fifth-grade student Casey Lynch took an idea to fruition as he organized a fundraiser to raise money for a cause that hits close to home. Casey’s father John Lynch was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and after successful treatment beat the disease. 

After approaching Waverly Principal John Ruggero with a written proposal, Casey put a plan into action to benefit the Lustgarten Foundation’s research on pancreatic cancer. He contacted the Lustgarten Foundation, which provided purple bracelets for Casey to sell for one dollar each to raise donations. Casey vigorously promoted the fundraiser by making a morning announcement, creating flyers to display around the building and encouraged his peers to help spread the word of the cause. 

Concluding the fundraiser, Casey and his classmates were visited by the Lustgarten Foundation Vice President of Development Linda Gruskiewicz. Ms. Gruskiewicz spoke to the students about the significance of pancreatic cancer research and the difficulties associated with the diagnosis. Following the informational discussion, Casey presented the Lustgarten Foundation with a check for the funds he raised in the amount of $700. 

Waverly Students Show Off Animal Artwork

Waverly Students Show Off Animal Artwork photo
Colorful creations were plentiful at Waverly Avenue Elementary School as fifth-grade students created animal bobble heads as part of an art activity exploring ceramics.

Utilizing ceramic clay, students in Susan Kinsey’s art class used their hands to sculpt cats and dogs for their bobble heads. Students used toilet paper rolls as armatures to create the body of their animals and then shaped the animal’s heads from pinch pots, a molding technique achieved by pinching the thumb and forefinger to form a bowl-shaped mold. 

As part of the lesson in ceramics, students learned each step of the kiln firing process to produce finished ceramic sculptures. Students began with the initial firing, called the bisque fire, before applying a glaze to their sculptures and placing them in the kiln for the final firing, known as the glaze fire. 

Throughout the building, each grade level is participating in a ceramics activity to encourage manual dexterity and support the creative process.